How to Participate

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Tips® campaign has been successful because of people like you. For every person who dies because of smoking, at least 30 people live with a serious smoking-related illness. Everyone’s story is different, but they all started with a cigarette. Share your story to help us encourage others to quit smoking.

We’re looking for people who used to smoke cigarettes who:

  • Have been diagnosed by a medical doctor with a smoking-related health condition.
  • Have been diagnosed by a medical doctor with a smoking-related health condition AND have a family member or other loved one who regularly takes care of you. We may feature both of you to tell your story of how the smoking-related health condition has changed your everyday lives.

Is this right for you?

Are you a person who used to smoke cigarettes and have been diagnosed with a smoking-related health condition, such as:

  • Cancer
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or another smoking-related lung disease
  • Heart disease
  • Stroke
  • Other smoking-related condition

Are you a person who used to smoke cigarettes and have been diagnosed with a mental health condition such as depression or anxiety?

Additionally, do you have a family member or other loved one who regularly takes care of you and would like to share their caregiving story as well?

Are you willing to:

  • Share your story on national media?
  • Travel, when it’s safe to do so, within the United States for filming and recording?
  • Agree to a background check?
  • Ask your doctor to verify in writing that smoking cigarettes contributed to your health condition?
  • Complete all necessary paperwork?

What we provide:

  • Each person who is hired will be compensated for their time with a one-time payment of $2,500.
  • Coverage of travel and lodging expenses when ads are filmed.

About the Tips campaign:

In the past 10 years, more than 40 people have bravely shared their stories through the Tips From Former Smokers® (Tips®) campaign. Their tips on how to live with a smoking-related disease or disability show the impact of smoking on the person who smokes as well as on their family members or loved ones who take care of them. The people featured in the Tips campaign know how hard it is to quit smoking. But they also know it can be even harder if you don’t quit.

From 2012-2018, the campaign has helped more than 16.4 million people who smoke try to quit and approximately 1 million quit successfully.

The goals of the campaign are to:

  • Build public awareness of the immediate health damage caused by smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke.
  • Encourage people who smoke to quit and let them know that free help is available if they want it.
  • Encourage people who do not smoke to protect themselves and their families from exposure to secondhand smoke.

Join Us

Frequently Asked Questions

Who is responsible for the Tips From Former Smokers campaign?

The Tips From Former Smokers campaign is managed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

How are participants selected?

Participants are selected based on a number of factors. These include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Quit smoking cigarettes at least six months ago and remained quit.
  • A diagnosis of one or more smoking-related health conditions.
  • Ability to share a compelling story about how smoking has negatively impacted their life.
  • Written verification from their medical doctor that smoking contributed to their health condition.
  • Pass a formal background check.
When will I know if I am selected?

The selection process may take several months. We will communicate with you throughout the process.

How will I be compensated?

We will pay for all travel, lodging, and expenses for you to attend filming, photography, and/or recording sessions. Additionally, a one-time $2,500 payment will be provided to those hired to be part of the campaign.

References to tobacco on this website are referring to commercial tobacco and not the sacred and traditional use of tobacco by some American Indian communities.